Lorentz Center - Applied Quantum Measurement (AQM07) from 5 Nov 2007 through 9 Nov 2007
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    Applied Quantum Measurement (AQM07)
    from 5 Nov 2007 through 9 Nov 2007

 
Measurement is fundamental in quantum mechanics, playing a role both critical and controversial

Measurement is fundamental in quantum mechanics, playing a role both critical and controversial. The founders of quantum theory recognized the striking differences between its role in quantum and classical physics. Rapid advances in experimental capability have only sharpened these differences. Recent theoretical developments have provided entirely new perspectives -- e.g., in quantum computation, measurements are not merely a way to extract information, but a powerful tool for implementing a computation.

 

The Applied Quantum Measurement workshop will establish links between a wide range of recent developments in the theory and practice of quantum measurement. We aim to gather a select group of students, post-docs, and senior researchers in a stimulating environment. Participants will include both theorists and experimentalists, working on quantum information, quantum computation, quantum gravity, quantum foundations, and related fields.

 

Interspersed within focused collaborative discussions, a series of keynote, tutorial, and contributed talks will survey recent developments and promising speculations in:

1.  Quantum inference and foundations of statistics
2.  Quantum state & process estimation
3.
 Measurements as a key ingredient in quantum algorithms
4.
 The emergence of classicality from measurement processes
5.  The mathematical structure of POVMs
6.
 Optimal measurements for testing non-classicality
7.
 Measurement in quantum gravity
8.
 Quantum metrology: extracting the ultimate limits from measurements
9.  Improving quantum measurements via quantum feedback control.

A significant part of the workshop will be devoted to scientific interaction among the participants, both formal (discussions and round tables) and informal (long coffee breaks). In order to optimize the working conditions and encourage discussion, we would like to limit the workshop to approximately 40 participants.



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